Advertising in Video Without Advertising

Advertising in Video Without Advertising

Ben Cecil Video Marketing

If I asked you whether or not you like video advertising, you’d probably say NO. Then, if I showed you the video below, and asked you if you like THIS video advertisement, your answer might be different.

My point? It’s not that we loathe video advertising. We just dislike bad or irrelevant video advertising. We dislike video advertising that’s obviously video advertising.

So what’s the difference? And how can you make sure your video advertising (and marketing) doesn’t fall into the bad or irrelevant category?

Here are some quick things to keep in mind when using video in advertising or tactical marketing. And also keep in mind, the commentary below is relevant for brands of all shapes and sizes. Not just those of us who spend big bucks with an advertising agency.


1) Great video advertising isn’t about your brand. It’s about your audience. If your target feels involved, then you may have a chance to win big. If you’re simply talking about your services and how badass you are, chances are your audience won’t care, even if they hear you.

“…brands that do it best rarely talk about specs or features.”Keep this in mind: the brands who do it best rarely talk about specs or features. Nike rarely talks shoes & shirts. Apple rarely talks RAM or laptop weight. Especially near the top of the sales funnel. Their campaigns make me feel like I can do great things in life.

What great things can your customers achieve?

2) Great video advertising often uses emotion. Whether it’s a laugh, a tear, rage, etc., we want to feel. We love emotions. They drive our decisions for better or for worse. Your video demo about your new cloud software does nothing for me, emotionally. Keep it down the sales funnel. Only emotions allowed up top.

What emotions are associated with your customers? Your product? Which emotions do you WANT associated with your brand?

3) Great video advertising is carefully crafted to fit the opportunity. I’m talking about context and something we call, “the viewer’s journey.” Is your video advertisement meant to be a YouTube pre-roll ad that runs before sports videos? Or is it meant to run on an airport’s closed circuit TVs? Or maybe even for the Lifetime network? You need to know. Different creative is required for not only different audiences, but different situations. Even quality video advertising falls flat when it’s shown to the wrong audience, wrong context or both. This is the land of irrelevance.

Where will you be serving up this video advertisement? What’s your viewer’s journey?

When your creative can use the context to its advantage, you just may win big.