New Approaches to Video Marketing in 2014

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1-29-2014 | By: Ben Cecil

Success in the online marketing world is dependent upon agility.  Sticking to your message but adapting to new effective methods of engagement is a must

Right now, video marketing is in the spotlight, but it's not what it used to be. Sure, message and story are still paramount but the way the market consumes this video content is changing rapidly. 

Here are some video marketing trends to watch out for in 2014:

Micro-video

In the past, Facebook has often been perceived as the leading social networking platform with respect to video marketing. But with the introduction of video to platforms like Pinterest and Instagram, along with the rise of exclusive micro-video platforms like SnapChat and Vine in 2013, the balance of power has tilted. Statistically, 3 to 15 second micro-videos are four times more likely to be redistributed than traditional videos (Jarrod Payne).  That’s a huge stat.  What are your plans to capitalize?

Mobile

By the end of 2014, it’s expected that Mobile traffic will account for 25% of all internet traffic (Mary Meeker, KPCB).  On Black Friday last year, 21.8% of all online sales were done via Mobile (Tech Crunch).   Mobile video played a huge role in this and will continue to play an even more dominant one.  Expect smaller files with the same video quality for ease of viewing and sharing.   It has even been suggested that within a few years, video content will account for nearly 70% of all internet traffic (Cisco).

TV to Mobile

Digital marketing has given us more accuracy and effectiveness with our campaigns.  Broadcast is a great to reach a lot of people.  But online marketing is a great way to reach the right 10 people, while using a fraction of the budget.  And with more and more entertainment-oriented content moving online, the move(stampede) from traditional TV to online video advertising will only happen faster.  This of course isn’t news to most of you.

New Screens, New Greens

A whole new screen category is emerging.  Wearables.  New types of screens like the iWatch and Google Glass will afford business owners an opportunity to experiment. In the coming year, expect marketers to combine video with interaction in order to more physically engage consumers in the selling process.

Your Brand is Not the Hero Anymore

2013 showed us that the best engagement is the kind that stars the user, not the brand.  This was most evident in the social and video marketing space of course.   Going forward, make sure you’re listening to your customer community.  Will your story resonate?  Will it bring them in?  The success of your video marketing campaign will depend on its ability to involve your current or prospective customers in a way that feels natural to them.  Emotion will continue to reign supreme.  Remember, your brand is not the hero!

Agile Video Presentations

People engage with content because it’s relevant to them.  And sometimes relevance isn’t only dependent on topic.  It can also be dependent on time and location.  Usually that time is NOW… especially at events like tradeshows, seminars or festivals.  On social media sites, posts related to the event spike leading up to it, and dwindle once the event is over, with nothing in between.  In order to improve the effectiveness of your video marketing campaign, you must involve those at the event.  Make them the focus of the story.   Do it on the spot and get it online right then and there.  Use this “agile content” to engage them online.  This will make your event efforts more fruitful, keeping interest alive for long enough to generate additional interest in your brand.



About the Author

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Ben Cecil

Ben is UPG's Strategy Director and has been crafting video campaigns for more than 10 years. Before UPG, Ben spent 7 years in local television, helping cultivate, deploy and measure branding efforts on broadcast and new media platforms. Ben hates boring video and loves chasing around his 2 year old son.

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